The 12 sons of Jacob.1
Judah
Simeon
Levi
Benjamin
Issachar
Zebulun
Dan
Asher
Naphtali
Reuben
Gad
Joseph
The shevatim as family lines.2
Judah
Simeon
Levi
Benjamin
Issachar
Zebulun
Dan
Asher
Naphtali
Reuben
Gad
Ephraim
Manasseh
The shevatim in heraldic symbols.3 
Judah
Simeon & Levi
Benjamin
Issachar
Zebulun
Dan
Asher
Naphtali
Reuben
Gad
Ephraim
Manasseh
The complete set of family lines.4
Judah
Simeon
Levi
Aaron
Benjamin
Issachar
Zebulun
Dan
Asher
Naphtali
Reuben
Gad
Ephraim
Manasseh
The shevatim as provinces.5
Judah
Benjamin
Issachar
Zebulun
Dan
Asher
Naphtali
Reuben
Gad
Ephraim
Manasseh
Manasseh in Gilead
The divided kingdom.6
Judah
Israel Issachar
Zebulun
Dan
Asher
Naphtali
Reuben
Gad
Ephraim
Manasseh
Manasseh in Gilead

1 There were originally twelve Israelite families, one for each son of Jacob. (Jacob in fact had thirteen children, a daughter Dinah in addition to the twelve sons.)
2 The descendants of Joseph kept track of which of his two sons they were descended from. Thus the shevet of Joseph was usually divided into two shevatim - Ephraim and Manasseh.
3 In order to keep the number twelve, heraldic symbols for the shevatim combine Simeon and Levi based on Jacob's blessing in Genesis 49:5 which describes them as brothers.
4 Although Aaron was of the shevet of Levi, the House of Aaron subsequently formed an additional family line - the Kohanim - separate from the shevatim.
5 When Joshua divided the land, there were no provinces associated with Simeon, Levi and the Kohanim. The Simeonites were given territory within the province of Judah. The Levites and Kohanim lived in various provinces and after the splitting of the kingdom, only in Judah. Manasseh had been given territory of both sides of the Jordan and subsequently formed two provinces.
6 When the kingdom split, the ten northernmost provinces chose Jeroboam as their king and kept the name Israel for their kingdom. Only the province of Judah, which had come to include the province of Benjamin, remained faithful to the House of David.